For the music nerds...

NetRngr

TAC Member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 26, 2016
Likes
235
Location
Darlington, SC
#1
I have a problem... I'm sure I have said this before. Went to the local crack dealers house, aka the local music store, and brought home a new baby today...

I give you the ESP LtD Bass I got today.
LtDBass.png
Active dual humbucking pickups, frets like buttah. Sounds mean as all get out as well. But I couldn't bring home the guitar without a sibling so ....

I give you the Eden EC10 Bass Amp:
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10" Speaker @ 50 watts. Should rattle the windows sufficiently to make the wife load the guns. ;)

Like I said.. I have a problem.

Guitar is available pretty much everywhere for $550ish the amp is around $200 or so walked out of the store with bass, amp, and a pretty nice strap for $589.
 

NetRngr

TAC Member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 26, 2016
Likes
235
Location
Darlington, SC
#3
Believe it or not I didn't learn how to play the guitar nor the bass until about two yrs. ago. I bought the original Rocksmith and the 2014 version and went through the tutorials. I am now at the point I can play in master mode (no notes appear on the screen unless you mess up ) and I have turned the dynamic difficulty off. ( the game starts you with partial notes and lets you build up to the full song as you get better) so I basically have sheet music till I hit 100% accuracy then I have a backing track.
You can buy DCL songs to add on and Customs Forge has custom DLC songs made by the players for pretty much anything you can think of except the Official DLC. At present I have around 400 songs both custom and official on my drive. Unless its a really difficult song like a Boston tune or Meatloaf ( damn you to hell Jim Steinman) I usually hit 90%+ accuracy in 2-3 tries.
If you want to learn I would recommend getting a decent entry lvl guitar/bass and a copy of Rocksmith. I know a few of the guys around here have it and some of my other friends from steam plus you can multiplayer guitar/bass for jam sessions.
 

Gator

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Site Administrator
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Mar 8, 2003
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1,283
Location
Atlanta, GA
#4
I did not know that. Thanks for sharing, because I think I might try it. Is it easier with an acoustic or electric guitar?
 

NetRngr

TAC Member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 26, 2016
Likes
235
Location
Darlington, SC
#5
Rocksmith 2014 I know can use a mic , not sure about the original or if its still available.

I would personally go with an electric or an acoustic/electric as Rocksmith has a USB cable that plugs into your guitar and is the most accurate at sensing the notes. They even have lessons on scales etc on Customs Forge that players have made that show you the scales. Some free advice incoming...

1) Get a decent guitar to start (Epiphone make great starter guitars at a good price and they are gibson owned The Fender Squier guitars are also pretty decent if you get a mid grade one) . One of the things that put learning players off is they buy a really cheap guitar to start under the assumption that if they dont like it they dont have much invested. Really cheap guitars will tear your fingers up as they are really hard to fret notes on and a lot of times have pretty scrappy electronics in them and that makes them sound pretty bad. I have several cheap guitars but the first thing I did was change out the pickups and pots etc to quality stuff. It makes a difference and for the cost of the new electronics plus the cheap guitar you could get a decent entry level.

2) Prepare for pain. No matter how good the guitar, until you build up some calluses on your fingers it will hurt. A good guitar will lessen this to some extent but it still will hurt for a little while just more so with a cheapo. (see above)

3) Find out the local music store where the musicians go. Guitar Center / Sam Ash etc are getting to the point that they aren't musician friendly anymore and most of the sales guys there dont know anything. Local guitar shops offer a lot of services the big chains dont or faster turn around.

4) Lastly and most importantly... No matter where you buy your guitar go ahead and foot the bill for a proper set up. I can't stress this enough.( this is where the local guitar shop comes in handy) Expensive or cheap guitars come with a basic production line setup but you will need to have someone who knows what they are doing do a full setup on your axe. Intonation, string height(action), pickup height, nut height etc all make a big difference in the way the instrument plays and the amount of pain you experience. Having this done eliminates fret buzz and having to bear down on the strings to fret notes. I have learned to do all of these things while learning to build guitars by hand so I just do it as I have all the special tools needed but its well worth the 40-50 bucks to have it done right and have a good set of strings put on.

I had to learn all this the hard way so I pass this tribal knowledge to you freely so you dont have to learn the hard way. Rock on Gator!